Reference List for Asian Holocaust Education

(Click here to download this information package in PDF format.)

 

ASIA-PACIFIC WAR

NANKING MASSACRE

POWS AND CANADIAN HONG KONG VETERANS

BIOLOGICAL AND CHEMICAL WARFARE

JAPAN’S MILITARY SEXUAL SLAVERY

AUDIO-VISUAL MATERIALS

RELATED WEBSITES


 

ASIA-PACIFIC WAR

 

Anderson, C. LeRoy; Joanne R. Anderson & Yunosuke Ohkura (eds.) No Longer Silent: World-Wide Memories of the Children of World War II  Missoula MT: Pictorial Histories, 1995.

 

The pains and pleasures, joys and sorrows of childhood during World War II are revealed in 38 memorable autobiographical essays from 24 countries. Compiled by C. LeRoy Anderson, Joanne R. Anderson, Yunosuke Ohkura, with a forward by Mike Mansfield, former U.S. Ambassador to Japan. Proceeds from sales of the book benefit four peace-promoting charities.

 

Bix, Herbert P. Hirohito and the Making of Modern Japan. HarperCollins Publishers, 2000

         

Winner of the Pulitzer Prize.  Bix is professor at Tokyo's Hitotsubasbi University. Aided by newly available primary documents, the book lifts the veil on the mythology surrounding the emperor's impact on the world stage. Focusing on Hirohito's interactions with his advisers and successive Japanese governments, it documents the strong, decisive role Hirohito played in most aspects of the Pacific war, from start to finish, and he voiced few objections to the most brutal outrages of his military. It recounts how American and Japanese leaders moved to justify the retention of Hirohito as emperor by whitewashing his wartime role and reshaping the historical consciousness of the Japanese people.

 

Bradley, James with Ron Powers. Flags of Our Fathers (NY: Bantam, 2001).

 

History & memory of the Battle for Iwo Jima, in which 22,000 Japanese & 26,000 American soldiers died.

 

Buruma, Ian.  The Wages of Guilt: Memories of War in Germany and Japan. HarperCollins Canada, 1994.

Offering a new perspective on the psyches of Germany and Japan after World War II.  As an expert on the two countries' politics and history, the author explores how each country dealt with its past and their legacies of guilt in light of the atrocities committed during the war.

 

Dower, John WJapan in War and Peace  New York: New Press, 1995.

 

A collection of selected essays which have been previously published in academic journals.  The author examines continuities and connections in Japanese politics, economics, and society at large, particularly highlighting its complex relations with the US over the past half century

 

Ienaga, Saburo (Translated by Frank Baldwin).  Pacific War, 1931 to 1945 : A Critical Perspective on Japan's Role in World War II  New York: Random House, 1978.

 

The books covers the period from Manchurian Incident in 1931 to the unconditional surrender in 1945 and encompasses the whole series of Japan’s military clashes with other countries.  The author tries to probe the meaning of the war, which includes the question how contemporary Japanese can prevent the reoccurrence of a war of aggression.

 

Ishida, Jintaro.  The Remains of War:  Apology and Forgiveness.  Guilford,

          Connecticut:  Lyons, 2001.

 

From jacket:  “Testimonies of the Japanese Imperial Army and its Filipino victims” (grade 11+)

 

Lee, Mei-fung.  Childhood Lost – Memoir of a self-taught grandma who grew up in a war-torn country.  Bauhinea Press, Canada, 2006.

 

          A moving account of what life was like for the ordinary people in South China during the Japanese invasion (1937-1945).  It is a precious narrative, seen through the innocent eyes of a child who tenaciously committed the details of those harsh, years to her memory so that she could recount it in writing one day.  She did so half a century later when she finally learned how to read and write.  The memoir was written in Chinese by grandma Lee, translated into English by her daughter, Winne and illustrations were created by her granddaughter, Josephine.

 

Li, Peter, ed.  The Search for Justice Japanese War Crimes.  New Brunswick (USA):  Transaction, 2003.

 

This collection undertakes the critical task of addressing some of the multifaceted and complex issues of Japanese war crimes and redress.This collection is divided into five themes. In "It's Never Too Late to Seek Justice, "the issues of reconciliation, accountability, and Emperor Hirohito's responsibility for war crimes are explored.  "The American POW Experience Remembered" includes a moving account of the Bataan Death March by an American ex-soldier. "Psychological Responses" discusses the socio-psychological affects of the Nanjing Massacre and Japanese vivisection on Chinese subjects. The way in which Japanese war atrocities have been dealt with in the theater and cinema is the focus of "Artistic Responses." And central to "History Must not Forget" are the questions of memory, trauma, biological warfare, and redress. Included in this volume are samples of the many presentations given at the International Citizens' Forum on War Crimes & Redress - Seeking Reconciliation & Peace for the 21st Century (ICF)  (Nov 1999 - Dec 1999)

 

Price, John. Orienting Canada: Race, Empire, and the Transpacific. UBC Press, 2011. http://www.ubcpress.ca/search/title_book.asp?BookID=299173232

          Shortlisted, 2012 Canadian Political History Book Prize, the Canadian Historical Association. 

Colony to nation? Isolationism to internationalism? WASP society to a multicultural Canada? Focusing on imperial conflicts in the Pacific, Orienting Canada disrupts these familiar narratives in Canadian history by tracing the relationship between racism and Canadian foreign policy. 

Grounded in transnationalism and anti-racist theory, this book reassesses critical transpacific incidents, including Vancouver's riots of 1907, the Chinese head tax, the wars in the pacific from 1937 to 1945, the internment of Japanese-Canadians, and Canada’s significant role in consolidating the US anti-communist empire in postwar Asia. Shocking revelations about the effects of racism and war into the 1960s are tempered by stories of community resilience and transformation. As a transpacific lens on the past, Orienting Canada deflects Canada’s European gaze back onto itself to reveal images that both provoke and unsettle.

 

Tanaka, Yuki.  Hidden Horrors : Japanese War Crimes in World War II.  Westview Press, 1998

 

Based on research in previously closed archives, this book represents an analysis of Japanese war crimes. The author explores individual atrocities in their broader social, psychological, and institutional milieu and places Japanese behavior during the war in the broader context of dehumanization of men at war – without denying individual and national responsibility.

 

Werner Gruhl. Imperial Japan's World War Two 1931-1945  Transaction Publishers, New Brunswick USA & London UK, 2007.

 

Forgotten Holocaust. (DVD) Director Raymond Lemoine.  Distributed by British Columbia Association for Learning and Preserving the History of WWII in Asia (ALPHA), 2007.  bcalpha@alpha-canada.org

 

The video documentary contains the stories of Nanking Massacre, “Comfort Station” and Forced Labor during the Asia-Pacific War with testimonies from 6 survivors.  The documentary was recorded during the 2006 Peace and Reconciliation Study to China for Canadian Educators by Raymond who was an educator himself.

 

Human Rights in the Asia Pacific 1931 – 1945:  Social Responsibility and Global Citizenship - A Resource Guide for Teachers to Support Aspects of Senior           Social Studies Curriculum.  Ministry of Education, Curriculum Branch,

          Province of British Columbia, 2001 & 2003(French version).

 

Co-published by the BC Association for Learning and Preserving the History of WWIII in Asia.  Background information, curriculum connections, lessons, resources and handouts provided.  (professional)

 

In the Name of the Emperor.  Videorecording.  Producer/directory Nancy Tong.  New York:  Filmakers Library, 1996.

 

“An account of the Nanking Massacre.  Integrates diary entries, actual film footage of the massacre shot by an American missionary (the Rev. John Magee), interviews with Japanese scholars and former soldiers who recalled in detail how they savagely killed and raped Chinese civilians, and the related story of the comfort women”  (summary from BPL online catalogue)

 

Voices of Survivors of the Asian Holocaust.  Compact disc.  Collected by Souad

          Sharabani.  Canada Association for Learning & Preserving the

          History of WWII in Asia, Toronto chapter.

 

Topics covered include:  chemical warfare, comfort women, Nanjing massacre and slave labour.   Various voices represented.  Can be heard online at http://voice-print.ca/CHINTEA2.mp3 and http://voice-print.ca/CHINTEA3.mp3

 

Witness to History:  Canadian Survivors of WWII in Asia.  DVD.  British Columbia Association for Learning and Preserving the History of WWII in Asia (ALPHA), 2005.

 

Four testimonies provided on this DVD:  Tony Cowling who spent 3 ½ years in many slave labour camps in the Dutch East Indies, Tang Tonjiang whose family moved many times fleeing Japanese attacks; Marius van Dijk van Nooten experienced many concentration camps in the Dutch East Indies, and Miriam who also experienced many concentration camps in Sumatra.

 


 

NANKING MASSACRE

 

Chang, Iris.  The Rape of Nanking:  The Forgotten Holocaust of World War II.  New York:  Penguin, 1997.  Print.  ISBN:  0-14-027744-7. 

 

From http://www.irischang.net/biography.cfmChang examines one of the most tragic chapters of World War II: the slaughter, rape and torture of hundreds of thousands of Chinese civilians by Japanese soldiers in the former capital of China.” (grade 11+)

 

Chang, Ying Ying.  The Woman  Who Could Not Forget: Iris Chang Before And Beyond The Rape Of Nanking. Pegasus, 2011.  ISBN: 978-1605981727

 

A moving, illuminating memoir about the life of world-famous author and historian, Iris Chang, as told by her mother.

Iris Chang's best-selling book The Rape of Nanking forever changed the way we view the Second World War in Asia. It all began with a photo of a river choked with the bodies of hundreds of Chinese civilians that shook Iris to her core. Who were these people? Why had this happened and how could their story have been lost to history? She could not shake that image from her head. She could not forget what she had seen.

A few short years later, Chang revealed this "second Holocaust" to the world. The Japanese atrocities against the people of Nanking were so extreme that a Nazi party leader based in China actually petitioned Hitler to ask the Japanese government to stop the massacre. But who was this woman that single-handedly swept away years of silence, secrecy and shame?

Her mother, Ying-Ying, provides an enlightened and nuanced look at her daughter, from Iris' home-made childhood newspaper, to her early years as a journalist and later, as a promising young historian, her struggles with her son's autism and her tragic suicide. The Woman Who Could Not Forget cements Iris' legacy as one of the most extraordinary minds of her generation and reveals the depth and beauty of the bond between a mother and daughter. 24 pages of black-and-white photographs

 

Hu, Hua-ling.  American Goddess at the Rape of Nanking:  The Courage of Minnie Vautrin.  Carbondale:  Southern Illinois UP, 2000.  ISBN:  0809323036. (Grade 9+).

 

Relying on original documents and interviews with people like Vautrin’s niece, the book presents the biography of an American educator/missionary who stood up to Japanese soldiers and protected the lives of thousands of women and children during the Rape of Nanking.

 

Hua-ling Hu Lian-hong Zhang (eds.) The Undaunted Women of Nanking: The Wartime Diaries of Minnie Vautrin and Tsen Shui-fang. Southern Illinois University Press, 2010.  ISBN-10: 0809329638   ISBN-13: 978-0809329632

         

In response to the atrocities committed during the Rape of Nanking, a group of westerners organized the International Committee for the Nanking Safety Zone and attempted to shelter refugees. Among these humanitarian heroes was Minnie Vautrin, an American missionary and acting president of Ginling College. She and Tsen Shui-fang, her Chinese assistant and a trained nurse, turned the college into a refugee camp, which protected more than 10,000 women and children during the height of the ordeal. Even though both women were exhausted mentally and physically from caring for so many, they kept detailed diaries during the massacre.

 

The Undaunted Women of Nanking juxtaposes the two women’s wartime diaries day-by-day from December 8, 1937, through March 1, 1938. Both diaries provide vital eyewitness accounts of the Rape of Nanking and are unique in their focus on the Ginling refugee camp and the sufferings of women and children. Tsen Shui-fang’s diary is the only known daily account by a Chinese national written during the crisis and not retrospectively. As such, it records a unique perspective: that of a woman grappling with feelings of anger, sorrow, and compassion as she witnesses the atrocities being committed in her war-torn country.

           

Editors Hua-ling Hu and Zhang Lian-hong have added many informative annotations to the diary entries from sources including the proceedings of the Tokyo War Crimes Trial of 1946, Vautrin’s correspondence, John Rabe’s diary, and other historical documents. Also included are biographical sketches of the two women, a note on the diaries, and information about the aftermath of the tragedy, as well as maps and photos—some of which appear in print for the first time. This book has been selected as one of the 10 best books by Chinese American Librarians Association for 2010.

 

Iris Chang Memorial Fund.  Denial and Its Cost: Reflections on Nanking Massacre 70 Years Ago and Beyond - Best Essays from Iris Chang Memorial Essay Contest 2007.  Cozy House, 2008.  ISBN:  9781593430801

 

Iris Chang Memorial Fund, Iris Chang and The Forgotten Holocaust - Best Essays from Iris Chang Memorial Essay Contest 2006.  Cozy House, 2007.  ISBN:9781593430603

 

Katsuichi, Honda.  The Nanjing Massacre:  A Japanese Journalist Confronts Japan’s National Shame.  Armonk, NY:  ME Sharpe, 1999.  Print. ISBN:  0765603349 ISBN:  0765603357

 

An account of Imperial Japan's systematic atrocities in China by a Japanese investigative journalist.  The author followed the murderous path of the Japanese troops in their capture of Nanking. From the troops’ landings on Chinese coast and their advance towards Nanking to the ultimate carnage in Nanking.  The author told the story by assembling interviews with Chinese victims and writings by Japanese perpetrators and observers.

 

Rabe, John.  The Good Man of Nanking:  The Diaries of John Rabe.  New York: 

          Vintage, 1998 (reprinted 2000). ISBN: 0375701974.  294 p.: ill. (Grade 10+)

 

John Rabe, a German businessman and leader of the Nazi Party in Nanking who saved so many lives in the Nanking massacre that some refer to him as the “Oskar Schindler of China”.   This book is the journal Rabe kept each night during those horrible months of  the Nanking Massacre and the difficult years that followed.

 

Shulman, William L.  The Nanjing Massacre:  Genocide and Denial.  Bayside, NY: 

          Holocaust Resource Centre.

 

“The Holocaust Center and Archives was established to provide an educational resource for organizations and schools in the community” (inside back cover).  This catalogue could be a representation of an exhibit by the Holocaust Center and Archives.  Includes Recommended Readings (grade 6+)

 

Smalley, Martha L. (ed). American Missionary Eyewitnesses to the Nanking Massacre, 1937 – 1938.  Yale Divinity School Library Occasional Publication No. 9, 1997.

 

A collection of letters and diaries written by 9 American missionaries in China during the Nanking Massacre.  The book documents these missionaries’ great contributions to humanity not merely because they saved so many lives but because their legacy of defending the truth and justice and cherishing good will toward man will brighten the future of mankind.

 

Young, Shi and James Yin.  The Rape of Nanking:  An Undeniable History in

          Photographs.  Innovative, 1996.

 

Black and white photos (many are very disturbing), testimonies, maps, appendices, index.  (grade 12+)

 

Zhu, Chen Shan, ed.  The Picture Collection of Nanjing Massacre and International Rescue.  Jiangsu:  Ancient Book, 2002.

 

Black and white photos (many are disturbing).  Includes images of the Memorial to the victims of the Nanjing Massacre in Nanjing.

 

City of Life and Death (Nanking Nanking – original  title) (DVD) Director: Lu Chuan. 2009 http://www.imdb.com/title/tt1124052/

           

The film deals with the Battle of Nanjing and its aftermath during the Second Sino-Japanese War. City of Life and Death takes place in 1937 during the Imperial Japanese Army's capture of the then-capital of China, Nanjing. the capture of the capital and the ensuing bloodshed is known as the Nanking Massacre, or the Rape of Nanking; a period of several weeks when tens of thousands of Chinese soldiers and civilians were killed. The film tells the story of several figures, both historical and fictional, including a Chinese soldier, a school teacher, a Japanese soldier, a foreign missionary, and John Rabe, a Nazi businessman who would ultimately save thousands of Chinese civilians.

 

Forgotten Holocaust. (DVD) Director Raymond Lemoine.  British Columbia Association for Learning and Preserving the History of WWII in Asia (ALPHA), 2007.  archive.alpha-canada.org/oralhistory

 

The video documentary contains the stories of Nanking Massacre, “Comfort Station” and Forced Labor during the Asia-Pacific War with testimonies from 6 survivors.  The documentary was recorded during the 2006 Peace and Reconciliation Study to China for Canadian Educators by Raymond who was an educator himself.

 

Good Nazi.  Videorecording. ABC News Nightline of December 11, 1997.  

 

Story of John Rabe who was a German businessman and leader of the Nazi Party in Nanking.  He saved hundreds of thousand of lives in the Nanking Massacre by setting up an International Safety Zone together with some other 20 western foreigners.

 

In the Name of the Emperor.  Videorecording.  Producer/directory Nancy Tong.  New York:  Filmakers Library, 1996.

 

“An account of the Nanking Massacre.  Integrates diary entries, actual film footage of the massacre shot by an American missionary (the Rev. John Magee), interviews with Japanese scholars and former soldiers who recalled in detail how they savagely killed and raped Chinese civilians, and the related story of the comfort women”  (summary from BPL online catalogue)

 

Iris Chang – The Rape of Nanking. (DVD)  Director Bill Spahic & Ann Pick. Produced by Real to Reel in association of Canada Association for Learning & Preserving the History of WWII in Asia , Toronto, 2007. http://www.irischangthemovie.com 

 

A feature-length documentary film about a young woman’s journey to bring one of the darkest chapters of history to light.

 

In July 1937 the Japanese Imperial Army, which already controlled a large section of northeastern China, launched an undeclared war against the Republic of China. Five months later, on December 13, its troops entered the capital city of Nanking and began raping and murdering its citizens in an orgy of violence that has few parallels in modern history.

 

Tens of thousands of Chinese prisoners-of-war were machine gunned en masse. An estimated 20,000 women were raped. Countless defenseless civilians; men, women and children were killed on the streets or in their homes. A British reporter who was on the scene compared the Japanese troops to Attila and the Huns. Writer George Will described the mass slaughter, which became known as “The Rape of Nanking” as “perhaps the most appalling single episode of barbarism in a century replete with horror.”

 

John Rabe. Director Florian Gallenberger. Co-Producers Benjamin Herrmann & Mischa Hofmann. Distributed by Strand Releasing in North America, 2009.

         

A 2009 Chinese-French-German biopictorial film. A true-story account of a German businessman who saved more than 200,000 Chinese during the Nanjing massacre in 1937-38.

 

May and August. (DVD) Director Raymond To. Hong Kong: Universe, 2002.

 

After the outbreak of the war, two young girls were orphaned and taken to a refugee camp. One by one, all their relatives are arrested and executed by the Japanese, and they are forced to become strong to face all the challenges posed by their new life.

 

Nanking. (DVD)  Co-Directors Bill Guttentag & Dan Sturman. Producer Ted Leonsis. Distributed by Fortissimo Films, 2007. Watch for free, click http://www.snagfilms.com/films/title/nanking/

 

In the winter of 1937, the Japanese army occupied Nanking and killed over 200,000 and raped tens of thousands of Chinese, one of human history's worst atrocities. In order to protect Chinese civilians, a small group of European and American expatriates, Western missionaries, professors, and businessmen banded together to save 250,000, risking their own lives.

The film describes the Nanking Massacre by reading from letters and diaries which shows the activities of John Rabe (Jurgen Prochnow), a German businessman, Robert O. Wilson (Woody Harrelson), the only surgeon remaining to care for legions of victims, and Minnie Vautrin (Mariel Hemingway), an educator who passionately defends the lives and honor of Nanking's women during the war time.

The film includes survivors who tell their own stories, the archival footage of the events, and the testimonies of Japanese soldiers who participated in the rampage.

 

Rev. Magee’s Testament – A Documentary of Nanjing Massacre 1937 – 1938. Videorecording. 1996.   

 

An American missionary used his 16 mm movie camera to recording what he saw in 1937 during the Nanking Massacre. Part of the documentary is quite gruesome which requires teacher’s discretion.

 

The Rape of Nanking. (DVD) Director: Lou Reda The History Channel, 1997.

 

The film documents the death and destruction that followed the Japanese occupation in Nanking in December 1937. In the next two months, hundreds of thousands Chinese soldiers and civilians were killed. Interviews with descendants of the victims and eyewitnesses to the crimes along with gruesome photos help separate fact from fiction.  

 

Torn Memories of Nanjing. (DVD) Director Tamaki Matsuoka, 2009 http://abcnews.go.com/Entertainment/wireStory?id=10248032

 

Although Japanese activist Ms. Tamaki Matsuoka is not a professional filmmaker, "Torn Memories of Nanjing" breaks new ground with interviews of both aggressors and victims. As described by Ms. Matsuoka, Chinese and Japanese perceptions of the war are completely different Hence, her mission is to reveal the facts. Ms. Matsuoka spent more than a decade interviewing hundreds of Chinese victims and Japanese veterans. Writing newspaper articles, compiling her interviews in books, holding photo exhibitions showing the atrocities and bringing victims to Japan, she was able to persuade some of them to speak on camera. 

 

Voices of Survivors of the Asian Holocaust.  Compact disc.  Collected by Souad Sharabani. Toronto Association for Learning & Preserving the History of WWII in Asia.

 

Topics covered include:  chemical warfare, comfort women, Nanjing massacre and slave labour.   Various voices represented.  Can be heard online at http://voice-print.ca/CHINTEA2.mp3  and http://voice-print.ca/CHINTEA3.mp3  

    


 

POWS AND CANADIAN HONG KONG VETERANS

 

Baird, Kenneth G.  Letters to Harvelyn:  From Japanese POW Camps:  A Canadian Soldier’s Letters to His Young Daughter During World War II.  Toronto, HarperCollins, 2002.

 

Major Baird of the Winnipeg Grenadiers writes letters to his daughter and wife.  (Grade 6+)

 

Daws, Gavan.  Prisoners of the Japanese : Pows of World War II in the Pacific. New York: Quill, 1994.

 

Based on hundreds of interviews with those who survived the Japanese imprisonment. The book contains recollections of American prisoners of war before, during, and after their capture.  16 pages of photos are included.

 

Endacott, G.B.  Hong Kong Eclipse.  Hong Kong: Oxford UP, 1978.

 

'Hong Kong Eclipse' was the first comprehensive study of Hong Kong during the Second World War, a catastrophic and crucial period in the Colony's history. The central theme is the Japanese conquest and occupation between the years 1941-1945, preceded by a picture of the Colony on the eve of the invasion and followed by an account of the problems of rehabilitation after the Japanese surrender.

From the Journal of Asian Studies (Aug. 1980) “Written for the general reader … Endacott focuses on the government and the British … Little Chinese materials is used … interest of the book is parochial and its audience local.”

 

MacDonnell, George S.  One soldier’s story 1939 – 1945:  From the fall of Hong Kong to the defeat of the Japan.  Toronto:  Dundurn, 2002. 

 

Personal narrative – biography

 

McIntosh, Dave.  Hell on earth : aging faster, dying sooner : Canadian prisoners of the Japanese during World War II  McGraw-Hill Ryerson, 1996.

 

          The book is constructed mainly from firsthand accounts of Canadian POWs who gave testimony to parliamentary inquiries as well as transcripts of medical interviews conducted by Dr. Marcel Gingras, whose report supports the compensation claim against Japan that was taken to the United Nations by the War Amps and Hong Kong veterans.

 

Roland, Charles G.  Long Night’s Journey into Day:  Prisoners of War in Hong Kong and Japan, 1941-1945.  Waterloo, Wilfrid Laurier UP, 2001.

 

Includes bibliographical references (p. 375-403) and index.

 

Tenney, Lester I. My Hitch in Hell: The Bataan Death March Washington: Brassey's, 1995.

 

          Memoir of US prisoner of war captured by Japanese at the beginning of the war in the Philippines.

 

Tromp, Sheri G. (ed.).  Four Years Till Tomorrow: Despair and Hope in Wartime Dutch East Indies.  Vanderheide Publishing, 1999.

 

26 survivors – many of whom were then children and are now living in British Columbia – relate their despair and hope in Japanese concentration camps in the 1940s Dutch East Indies (now Indonesia).  These survivor stories give readers a deeper understanding of what human beings are capable of, in terms of both cruelty and heroism.

 

Vincent, Carl.  No Reason Why:  The Canadian Hong Kong Tragedy – An Examination.  Belleville (ON):  Canada’s Wings, 1981.

 

From the back cover:  “In late 1941 almost 2000 Canadian troops set said for Hong Kong.  Nearly 600 of them would not come back.  Black and white photos, map and index are provided.  (grade 11+)

 

Canada’ Hong Kong Veterans – The Compensation Story (DVD).  Producer: Cliff Chadderton. The War Amps of Canada. 1993 (Available in most public library systems in B.C.)

 

The documentary is produced and hosted by, War Amps CEO.  It covers the struggles of former Hong Kong PoWs for compensation including making their case to Japanese government, the Human Rights Commission of the United Nations, and the Canadian government.  Archival footage and artists’ illustrations convey the horrors endured by the prisoners of war.

 

Savage Christmas:  Hong Kong 1941.  Videorecording.  Directed by Brian McKenna.  Montreal: National Film Board, 1992.  (The Valor and the Horror series) http://www.valourandhorror.com/P_Reply/HK.php 

 

The story of the Hong Kong campaign deals with questionable decisions by Canadian and British politicians, poor planning and strategy by the British military leaders in the colony of Hong Kong, and the savage brutality of the attacking Japanese force. But, most importantly, it is a film about the fighting spirit, courage and tenacity of the 1,975 young Canadian soldiers who, in December 1941, found themselves in a no-win situation against all of the odds that were stacked against them.

 

Witness to History:  Canadian Survivors of WWII in Asia (DVD).  British Columbia Association for Learning and Preserving the History of WWII in Asia (ALPHA), 2005. http://archive.alpha-canada.org/OralHistory

 

Four testimonies provided on this DVD:  Tony Cowling who spent 3 ½ years in many slave labour camps in the Dutch East Indies, Tang Tonjiang whose family moved many times fleeing Japanese attacks; Marius van Dijk van Nooten experienced many concentration camps in the Dutch East Indies, and Miriam who also experienced many concentration camps in Sumatra.

 


 

BIOLOGICAL AND CHEMICAL WARFARE

 

Barenblatt, Daniel.  A Plague Upon Humanity:  The Secret Genocide of Axis Japan’s Germ Warfare Operation.  New York:  HarperCollins, 2004.

 

          Journalist Barenblatt, an expert on Japanese biological warfare, valuably summarizes the known facts and reasonable speculations about it. Like many other aspects of science in Japan, the country's knowledge of biology was much more advanced before World War II than the rest of the world believed. Japan's biological warfare capability, carefully developed with the direct support of the emperor, had been tested upon Chinese and Western subjects and deployed operationally at the cost of as many as a million Chinese lives. After the war, cold war politics prevented war-crimes prosecution of Japanese biowar experts and may have led to the use of their talents and stocks of material in Korea (Barenblatt grants that such use has not been proven). Barenblatt's useful addition to the literature on biological warfare and WWII belongs on the same shelf as Iris Chang's The Rape of Nanking (1997) and studies of the comfort girls, where it may, however, raise the hackles of Japanese still in the dark about their country's war crimes.

 

Gold, Hal.  Unit 731Testimony.  Tokyo:  Yenbooks, 1996. (Grade 11+)

 

This book is on Japan’s wartime human experimentation.  It works as  a forum for victims, veterans, former doctors and secret police alike to recount their stories and their role in the horrifying activities of Unit 731, the leading Japanese unit responsible for such atrocities.

 

Harris, Sheldon H.  Factories of Death:  Japanese Biological Warfare 1932 – 45 and the American Cover up.  Routledge, 1994.  New York:  Norton, 1994. (Grade 11+)

 

Harris presents evidence from Chinese, American and KGB archives that Japanese scientists used human beings, including Allied prisoners of war, in biological warfare (BW) research during the Japanese occupation of Manchuria. (Publishers Weekly, at http://www.amazon.com/Factories-Death-S-Harris/dp/0415132061) (Grade 11+)

 

Correspondent: Unit 731. Videorecording. Producer: Giselle Portenier. BBC, 2002. http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/programmes/correspondent/1796044.stm

 

            Unit 731 was a special division of the Japanese Army, a scientific and military elite. It had a huge budget specially authorized by the Emperor, to develop weapons of mass destruction that would win the war for Japan. America and Germany had their nuclear arms race. Japan put its faith in germs. This documentary covered the story of the Chinese plaintiffs in their struggle for the compensation lawsuit against the Japanese government.  There were also stories of Japanese ex-soldiers who had involved in Unit 731 as well as interviews of Japanese right-wingers who blatantly denied any biological and chemical warfare experimentations and atrocities committed by Japanese imperial forces.

 

Hidden Holocaust in World War II by the Japanese Army.  print 1998.

 

From the front cover:  “Japanese delegation to the photo exhibitions of war atrocities committed by Japanese Army (June 25 – July 7, 1998).” Contributions from Japanese testifiers including lawyers, scholars and ex-soldiers who have involved in the Lawsuit of Germ Warfare Against the Japanese Government and statements from Chinese plaintiffs (victims) are included.  Appendices.  (grade 10+) Available with BC ALPHA (bcalpha@alpha-canada.org)

 

Unit 731: Nightmare in Manchuria.  (DVD)  The History Channel, 1999.

 

The documentary covers the top secret research facility called Unit 731.   Japanese doctor Shiro Ishii, head of Unit 731 and his staff conducted bio-chemical weapons research that claimed the lives of untold thousands, perhaps even hundreds of thousands. Such deeds were not exposed and no one was ever punished for the atrocities committed  at unit 731 and other similar camps, because the documents recording their grim findings were secretly sold to the United States in exchange for amnesty.

 


 

JAPAN’S MILITARY SEXUAL SLAVERY

 

Boling, David. Mass Rape, Enforced Prostitution, & the Japanese Imperial Army: Japan Eschews International Legal Responsibility? (Baltimore: U. Maryland School of Law, 1995).

 

Dai Sil Kim-Gibson, Silence Broken: Korean Comfort Women. A book and film. BOOK: Parkersburg, Iowa: Mid-Prairie Books. ISBN 0-931209-88-9. 1999. FILM: 35 mm (88 minutes) or video (57 minutes) Ho-ho-Kus, NJ: Dai Sil Productions. 1999.

 

Silence Broken is essentially an oral history of Korean women who were forced into sexual slavery by Japan during World War II. Their stories, told to the author in Korea, China and Japan, are the core of the book. Additional chapters provide readers with contextual and historical information. The stories of these women contain their 'flesh and blood', as one reader put it. In addition to presenting the stories, Kim-Gibson explores their lives before and after forced servitude. Other works focus on their years of servitude.

 

Henson, Maria Rosa. Comfort Woman : A Filipina's Story of Prostitution and Slavery Under the Japanese Military.  Rowman & Littlefield Publishing Inc. 1999.

 

          An autobiography of a Filipino sex slave under the Japanese imperial forces. In April 1943, fifteen-year-old Maria Rosa Henson was taken by Japanese soldiers occupying the Philippines and forced into prostitution as a comfort woman. In this simply told yet powerfully moving autobiography, Rosa recalls her childhood as the illegitimate daughter of a wealthy landowner, her work for Huk guerillas, her wartime ordeal, and her marriage to a rebel leader who left her to raise their children alone. Her triumph against all odds is embodied by her decision to go public with the secret she had held for fifty years. Illustrations drawn by the author reflect the images of her painful experience that still stays in her mind.

 

Hicks, George.  The Comfort Women:  Japan’s Brutal Regime of Enforced Prostitution in the Second World War.  WW Norton, 1997.  ISBN:  0393038076.  ISBN:  0393316947 (pbk)  303 p.:  ill., map

 

Includes some personal testimonies, Select annotated bibliography and index.  (grade 11+)

 

Howard, Keith. True Stories of the Korean Comfort Women L P CInBook, 1996.

Recent development in human rights and women's rights in Korea have led the surviving comfort women to overcome traditional taboos of chastity, defilement and shame and speak out for the first time. Their testimonies portray the coercion, violence, abduction, rape and false imprisonment they suffered at the hands of the Japanese military. Some women were as young ad twelve years old when their ordeal began.

 

Kelle, Nora.  Comfort Woman Penguin Books, 1998

 

Possessing a wisdom and maturity rarely found in a first novelist, Korean-American writer Nora Okja Keller tells a heartwrenching and enthralling tale in this, her literary debut. Comfort Woman is the story of Akiko, a Korean refugee of World War II, and Beccah, her daughter by an American missionary. The two women are living on the edge of society -- and sanity -- in Honolulu, plagued by Akiko''s periodic encounters with the spirits of the dead, and by Beccah''s struggles to reclaim her mother from her past. Slowly and painfully Akiko reveals her tragic story and the horrifying years she was forced to serve as a "comfort woman" to Japanese soldiers. As Beccah uncovers these truths, she discovers her own strength and the secret of the powers she herself possesses -- the precious gifts her mother has given her.

 

Kimm, Samuel. Cries of the Korean Comfort Women: The Vivid Testimony of a Korean Teenaged Girl During World War II.  Xlibris Corporation, 2004. ISBN-10: 1413400787.

 

Korean Council for Women Drafted for Military Sexual Slavery by Japan. True Stories of the Korean Comfort Women: Testimonies NY: Cassell, 1995.

 

Schellstede, Sangmie Choi, ed., Comfort Women Speak:  Testimony by Sex Slaves of the Japanese Military.  New York:  Homes & Meier, 2000.

 

Little was known about the true scope of this crime against humanity until 1991, when after almost fifty years of silence, seventy-four-year-old Kim Hak-soon bravely told the world of her experiences as a comfort woman. Her testimony gave others the strength to tell their stories. This book , with photos, documents the lives of nineteen courageous surviving rape camp victims (Korean) who continue to seek a formal apology and reparation from Japan's government for the horrors it imposed on them. Black and white photos and United Nations human rights report provided. (Grade 10+)

 

Stetz, Margaret and Oh, Bonnie B. C. ed. Legacies of the Comfort Women of World War II, Armonk, N.Y.: M. E. Sharpe, Inc. 2001.

 

Artists, historians, activists, and others trace the legacy of the victims of Japanese military sexual slavery by discussing historical and cultural contexts, academic and activist responses, and works of art it has inspired.

A book of essays, was inspired by an international conference on "Comfort Women" held at Georgetown University in Washington, D. C. in 1996. The collection is a must read for scholars, activists, and Asianists interested not only in historical detail, but also in understanding the persisting, unresolved issues of World War II that cloud Japan's relations with its Asian neighbors and many of its former Allied enemies. The essence of the book is conveyed in the title, which emphasizes the 'legacies' of the comfort women, rather than their 'stories', some of which can be found in the existing literature by many of the authors of individual chapters. The book reflects the activist tone of the conference and the positive results that such activism has played in the international arena in the past decade. http://koreaweb.ws/ks/ksr/ksr02-08.htm

 

Yoshimi, Yoshiaki;  O’Brien, Suzanne (translator). Comfort Women : Sexual Slavery in the Japanese Military During World War II.  Columbia University Press, 2000

 

Yoshiaki, history professor at Tokyo's Chuo University, found and published the first documentary evidence that the Japanese military established and ran "comfort stations".  This book traces the history of the military comfort station system at various stages of the war in Asia and analyzes the issue against the background of Japan's prewar system of licensed prostitution and contemporary Asian sex tourism in which Japanese men continue to exploit the women of neighboring Asian countries. His study considers the gender, ethnic, and class aspects of this disturbing history. The translator's introduction illuminates the ongoing debate in Japan over the “comfort women” issue.  

 

Breaking the History of Silence - The Women’s International War Crimes Tribunal on Japan’s Military Sexual Slavery. (VHS/Color/68mins) Produced by: Video Juku, AWW-NET Japan, 2001. http://www.jca.apc.org/video-juku/trib-eng.html

 

The Women's International War Crimes Tribunal held in Tokyo, Japan from December 8th to 12th, 2000, was a Peoples' Tribunal set up to bring those responsible for Japan's military sexual violence, in particular the enslavement of "comfort women," to justice, and to end the ongoing cycle of impunity for wartime violence against women.

A revolutionary tribunal representing people from all across Asia, it was the first of its kind to break Japan's post-war taboo by finding Emperor Hirohito guilty of war crimes during WWII.

 

Forgotten Holocaust. (DVD) Director Raymond Lemoine.  British Columbia Association for Learning and Preserving the History of WWII in Asia (ALPHA), 2007.  archive.alpha-canada.org/oralhistory  

 

The video documentary contains the stories of Nanking Massacre, “Comfort Station” and Forced Labor during the Asia-Pacific War with testimonies from 6 survivors.  The documentary was recorded during the 2006 Peace and Reconciliation Study to China for Canadian Educators by Raymond who was an educator himself.

 

In the Name of the Emperor.  Videorecording.  Producer/director Nancy Tong.  New York: Filmakers Library, 1996.

         

“An account of the Nanking Massacre.  Integrates diary entries, actual film footage of the massacre shot by an American missionary (the Rev. John Magee), interviews with Japanese scholars and former soldiers who recalled in detail how they savagely killed and raped Chinese civilians, and the related story of the comfort women”  (summary from BPL online catalogue)

 

Silence Broken: Korean Comfort Women. (DVD) Director: Dai Sil Kim-Gibson, 88min. Ho-ho-Kus, NJ: Dai Sil Productions. 1999.

 

Silence Broken is essentially an oral history of Korean women who were forced into sexual slavery by Japan during World War II. Their stories, told to the author in Korea, China and Japan, are the core of the book. Additional chapters provide readers with contextual and historical information. The stories of these women contain their 'flesh and blood', as one reader put it. In addition to presenting the stories, Kim-Gibson explores their lives before and after forced servitude. Other works focus on their years of servitude.

 

Silent Shame.  (DVD) Director, Writer, Editor and Producer Akiko Izumitani, 2010 http://www.silentshamedocumentary.com/pages/about.html

 

Why are more people not aware of Japan's role in war crimes in Asia during WWII? This journey will begin by confronting a modern people with its controversial and sometimes shameful past. A Japanese-born filmmaker learns more about the atrocities committed by her nation through meeting veterans, researchers, and activists.
The film continues by delving into a past that many Japanese find too painful to explore. Archival footage clearly illustrates a basic history of Asia intercut with interviews of Japanese veterans and historical researchers detailing war crimes carried out by the Japanese. This section segues into a segment about "Comfort Women". Interviews with Korean rape victims and their Japanese perpetrators, finally give a voice to these often forgotten victims of WWII. Human experimentation and biological warfare is explored in segment number three, and in a rare interview, a Japanese veteran details how he assisted in human experimentation. This segment closes with the filmmaker interviewing several American POWs about Bataan Death March and their brutal treatment during their imprisonment as slave labors.
In the course of making this documentary, the filmmaker realizes that Japanese researchers and activists receive tremendous amount of resistance on this topic by right wing Japanese. The journey closes with the filmmaker interviewing Japanese veterans, researchers and activists in an attempt to discover why the Japanese people are so reluctant to talk about the unpleasant side of their history.

 

Voices of Survivors of the Asian Holocaust.  Compact disc.  Collected by Souad Sharabani.  Toronto Association for Learning & Preserving the History of WWII in Asia.

 

Topics covered include:  chemical warfare, comfort women, Nanjing massacre and slave labour.   Various voices represented.  Can be heard online at http://voice-print.ca/CHINTEA2.mp3 and http://voice-print.ca/CHINTEA3.mp3 

 

“You can never forget, never…” – Her Stories. Korean Council for Women Drafted for Military Sexual Slavery by Japan, 2008.

 

          Offers an overview of the highly controversial issue regarding "comfort women.

 


 

AUDIO-VISUAL

 

Canada’ Hong Kong Veterans – The Compensation Story (DVD).  Producer: Cliff Chadderton. The War Amps of Canada. 1993 (Available in most public library systems in B.C.)

          

The documentary is produced and hosted by, War Amps CEO.  It covers the struggles of former Hong Kong PoWs for compensation including making their case to Japanese government, the Human Rights Commission of the United Nations, and the Canadian government.  Archival footage and artists’ illustrations convey the horrors endured by the prisoners of war.

 

Correspondent: Unit 731. Videorecording. Producer: Giselle Portenier. BBC, 2002. http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/programmes/correspondent/1796044.stm 

 

          Unit 731 was a special division of the Japanese Army, a scientific and military elite. It had a huge budget specially authorized by the Emperor, to develop weapons of mass destruction that would win the war for Japan. America and Germany had their nuclear arms race. Japan put its faith in germs. This documentary covered the story of the Chinese plaintiffs in their struggle for the compensation lawsuit against the Japanese government.  There were also stories of Japanese ex-soldiers who had involved in Unit 731 as well as interviews of Japanese right-wingers who blatantly denied any biological and chemical warfare experimentations and atrocities committed by Japanese imperial forces.

 

City of Life and Death (Nanking Nanking – original  title) (DVD) Director: Lu Chuan. 2009 http://www.imdb.com/title/tt1124052/ 

 

The film deals with the Battle of Nanjing and its aftermath during the Second Sino-Japanese War. City of Life and Death takes place in 1937 during the Imperial Japanese Army's capture of the then-capital of China, Nanjing. The capture of the capital and the ensuing bloodshed is known as the Nanking Massacre, or the Rape of Nanking; a period of several weeks when tens of thousands of Chinese soldiers and civilians were killed. The film tells the story of several figures, both historical and fictional, including a Chinese soldier, a school teacher, a Japanese soldier, a foreign missionary, and John Rabe, a Nazi businessman who would ultimately save thousands of Chinese civilians.

 

Forgotten Holocaust. (DVD) Director Raymond Lemoine.  British Columbia Association for Learning and Preserving the History of WWII in Asia (ALPHA), 2007.  archive.alpha-canada.org/oralhistory

 

The video documentary contains the stories of Nanking Massacre, “Comfort Station” and Forced Labor during the Asia-Pacific War with testimonies from 6 survivors.  The documentary was recorded during the 2006 Peace and Reconciliation Study to China for Canadian Educators by Raymond who was an educator himself.

 

Good Nazi.  Videorecording. ABC News Nightline of December 11, 1997.  

 

Story of John Rabe who was a German businessman and leader of the Nazi Party in Nanking.  He saved hundreds of thousands of lives in the Nanking Massacre by setting up an International Safety Zone together with some other 20 western foreigners.

 

In the Name of the Emperor.  Videorecording.  Producer/directory Nancy Tong.  New York:  Filmakers Library, 1996.

 

“An account of the Nanking Massacre.  Integrates diary entries, actual film footage of the massacre shot by an American missionary (the Rev. John Magee), interviews with Japanese scholars and former soldiers who recalled in detail how they savagely killed and raped Chinese civilians, and the related story of the comfort women”  (summary from BPL online catalogue)

 

Iris Chang – The Rape of Nanking. (DVD)  Director Bill Spahic & Ann Pick. Produced by Real to Reel in association of Canada Association for Learning & Preserving the History of WWII in Asia, Toronto, 2007. http://www.irischangthemovie.com  

 

A feature-length documentary film about a young woman’s journey to bring one of the darkest chapters of history to light.

July 1937 the Japanese Imperial Army, which already controlled a large section of northeastern China, launched an undeclared war against the Republic of China. Five months later, on December 13, its troops entered the capital city of Nanking and began raping and murdering its citizens in an orgy of violence that has few parallels in modern history.

Tens of thousands of Chinese prisoners-of-war were machine gunned en masse. An estimated 20,000 women were raped. Countless defenseless civilians; men, women and children were killed on the streets or in their homes. A British reporter who was on the scene compared the Japanese troops to Attila and the Huns. Writer George Will described the mass slaughter, which became known as “The Rape of Nanking” as “perhaps the most appalling single episode of barbarism in a century replete with horror.”

 

Japan's Peace Constitution. (DVD) Director: John Junkerman. Icarus Films, 2005. http://icarusfilms.com/new2006/jap.html 

 

In 2005, sixty years after the end of World War II, a conservative Japanese government is pressing ahead with plans to revise the nation's constitution and jettison its famous no-war clause, Article 9. This timely, hard-hitting documentary places the ongoing debate over the constitution in an international context: What will revision mean to Japan's neighbors, Korea and China? How has the US-Japan military alliance warped the constitution and Japan's role in the world? How is the unprecedented involvement of Japan's Self-Defense Force in the occupation of Iraq perceived in the Middle East?

Through interviews conducted with leading thinkers around the world, the film explores the origins of the Constitution in the ashes of war, and the significance of its peace clauses in the conflicted times of the early 21st century.

 

John Rabe. Director Florian Gallenberger. Co-Producers Benjamin Herrmann & Mischa Hofmann. Distributed by Strand Releasing in North America, 2009. http://www.imdb.com/title/tt1124377/

 

          A 2009 Chinese-French-German biopictorial film. A true-story account of a German businessman who saved more than 200,000 Chinese during the Nanjing massacre in 1937-38.

 

May and August. (DVD) Director Raymond To. Hong Kong: Universe, 2002.

 

After the outbreak of the war, two young girls were orphaned and taken to a refugee camp. One by one, all their relatives are arrested and executed by the Japanese, and they are forced to become strong to face all the challenges posed by their new life.

 

Nanking. (DVD)  Co-Directors Bill Guttentag & Dan Sturman. Producer Ted Leonsis. Distributed by Fortissimo Films, 2007. Watch for free, click http://www.snagfilms.com/films/title/nanking/ 

 

In the winter of 1937, the Japanese army occupied Nanking and killed over 200,000 and raped tens of thousands of Chinese, one of human history's worst atrocities. In order to protect Chinese civilians, a small group of European and American expatriates, Western missionaries, professors, and businessmen banded together to save 250,000, risking their own lives.

The film describes the Nanking Massacre by reading from letters and diaries which shows the activities of John Rabe (Jürgen Prochnow), a German businessman, Robert O. Wilson (Woody Harrelson), the only surgeon remaining to care for legions of victims, and Minnie Vautrin (Mariel Hemingway), an educator who passionately defends the lives and honor of Nanking's women during the war time.

The film includes survivors who tell their own stories, the archival footage of the events, and the testimonies of Japanese soldiers who participated in the rampage.

 

Rev. Magee’s Testament – A Documentary of Nanjing Massacre 1937 – 1938. Videorecording. 1996.   

 

An American missionary used his 16 mm movie camera to recording what he saw in 1937 during the Nanking Massacre. Part of the documentary is quite gruesome which requires teacher’s discretion.

 

Savage Christmas:  Hong Kong 1941.  Videorecording.  Directed by Brian McKenna.  Montreal: National Film Board, 1992. 
(The Valor and the Horror series) http://www.valourandhorror.com/P_Reply/HK.php

 

The story of the Hong Kong campaign deals with questionable decisions by Canadian and British politicians, poor planning and strategy by the British military leaders in the colony of Hong Kong, and the savage brutality of the attacking Japanese force. But, most importantly, it is a film about the fighting spirit, courage and tenacity of the 1,975 young Canadian soldiers who, in December 1941, found themselves in a no-win situation against all of the odds that were stacked against them.

 

Silence Broken: Korean Comfort Women. (DVD) Director: Dai Sil Kim-Gibson, 88min. Ho-ho-Kus, NJ: Dai Sil Productions. 1999.

 

Silence Broken is essentially an oral history of Korean women who were forced into sexual slavery by Japan during World War II. Their stories, told to the author in Korea, China and Japan, are the core of the book. Additional chapters provide readers with contextual and historical information. The stories of these women contain their 'flesh and blood', as one reader put it. In addition to presenting the stories, Kim-Gibson explores their lives before and after forced servitude. Other works focus on their years of servitude.

 

Silent Shame.  (DVD) Director, Writer, Editor and Producer Akiko Izumitani, 2010

http://www.silentshamedocumentary.com/pages/about.html

 

Why are more people not aware of Japan's role in war crimes in Asia during WWII? This journey will begin by confronting a modern people with its controversial and sometimes shameful past. A Japanese-born filmmaker learns more about the atrocities committed by her nation through meeting veterans, researchers, and activists.
 
The film continues by delving into a past that many Japanese find too painful to explore. Archival footage clearly illustrates a basic history of Asia intercut with interviews of Japanese veterans and historical researchers detailing war crimes carried out by the Japanese. This section segues into a segment about "Comfort Women". Interviews with Korean rape victims and their Japanese perpetrators, finally give a voice to these often forgotten victims of WWII. Human experimentation and biological warfare is explored in segment number three, and in a rare interview, a Japanese veteran details how he assisted in human experimentation. This segment closes with the filmmaker interviewing several American POWs about Bataan Death March and their brutal treatment during their imprisonment as slave labors.
 
In the course of making this documentary, the filmmaker realizes that Japanese researchers and activists receive tremendous amount of resistance on this topic by right wing Japanese. The journey closes with the filmmaker interviewing Japanese veterans, researchers and activists in an attempt to discover why the Japanese people are so reluctant to talk about the unpleasant side of their history.

 

The Rape of Nanking. (DVD) Director: Lou Reda The History Channel, 1997.

 

          The film documents the death and destruction that followed the Japanese occupation in Nanking in December 1937. In the next two months, hundreds of thousands Chinese soldiers and civilians were killed. Interviews with descendants of the victims and eyewitnesses to the crimes along with gruesome photos help separate fact from fiction.  

 

Torn Memories of Nanjing. (DVD) Director Tamaki Matsuoka, 2009    http://abcnews.go.com/Entertainment/wireStory?id=10248032

 

Although Japanese activist Ms. Tamaki Matsuoka is not a professional filmmaker, "Torn Memories of Nanjing" breaks new ground with interviews of both aggressors and victims. As described by Ms. Matsuoka, Chinese and Japanese perceptions of the war are completely different Hence, her mission is to reveal the facts. Ms. Matsuoka spent more than a decade interviewing hundreds of Chinese victims and Japanese veterans. Writing newspaper articles, compiling her interviews in books, holding photo exhibitions showing the atrocities and bringing victims to Japan, she was able to persuade some of them to speak on camera.

 

Unit 731: Nightmare in Manchuria.  (DVD)  The History Channel, 1999.

 

The documentary covers the top secret research facility called Unit 731.   Japanese doctor Shiro Ishii, head of Unit 731 and his staff conducted bio-chemical weapons research that claimed the lives of untold thousands, perhaps even hundreds of thousands. Such deeds were not exposed and no one was ever punished for the atrocities committed at unit 731 and other similar camps, because the documents recording their grim findings were secretly sold to the United States in exchange for amnesty.

 

Voices of Survivors of the Asian Holocaust.  Compact disc.  Collected by Souad Sharabani.  Canada Association for Learning & Preserving the

          History of WWII in Asia, Toronto chapter.

 

Topics covered include:  chemical warfare, comfort women, Nanjing massacre and slave labour.   Various voices represented.  Can be heard online at http://voice-print.ca/CHINTEA2.mp3  and http://voice-print.ca/CHINTEA3.mp3

 

Witness to History:  Canadian Survivors of WWII in Asia (DVD).  British Columbia Association for Learning and Preserving the History of WWII in Asia (ALPHA), 2005. http://archive.alpha-canada.org/OralHistory

 

Four testimonies provided on this DVD:  Tony Cowling who spent 3 ½ years in many slave labour camps in the Dutch East Indies, Tang Tonjiang whose family moved many times fleeing Japanese attacks; Marius van Dijk van Nooten experienced many concentration camps in the Dutch East Indies, and Miriam who also experienced many concentration camps in Sumatra.

 

“You can never forget, never…” – Her Stories. Korean Council for Women Drafted for Military Sexual Slavery by Japan, 2008.

         

Offers an overview of the highly controversial issue regarding "comfort women”.

 


 

RELATED WEBSITES

 

·        BC ALPHA at http://archive.alpha-canada.org and for Links of interest and Learning Resources.

·        The Nanking Massacre Project from the Special Collections of the Yale Divinity School Library.

·        Memorial & Reconciliation in the Asia-Pacific at George Washington University, Washington DC website.

 

 

Compiled for BC ALPHA by Pat Parungao, teacher-librarian, 2006 BC ALPHA Study Tour participant

Revised and updated by BC ALPHA May 2012